On this page, we will briefly explain and describe how a dorsiventral leaf is adapted for photosynthesis.

What is a Dorsiventral Leaf?

  1. Dorsiventral leaves
    Dorsiventral leaves orient themselves at an angle to the main axis and perpendicular to the direction of sunlight. Most dicots have dorsi-ventral leaves that are net-veined, including most trees, bushes, garden plants and wildflowers.
  2. Isobilateral leaves
    Isobilateral leaves orient themselves parallel to the main axis and parallel to the direction of sunlight. Most monocots possess parallel-veined isobilateral leaves, including grasses and grasslike plants, lilies, irises, amaryllises etc.
A dorsiventral leaf

Source: ScienceTopia

Video Lesson

How a Dorsiventral Leaf is Adapted for Photosynthesis

Dorsiventral Leaves have a large surface area so more light hits them. The upper epidermis of the leaf is transparent, allowing light to enter the leaf. The palisade cells contain many chloroplasts which allow light to be converted into energy by the leaf. The leaf also has air spaces which allow better diffusion of carbon dioxide into the leaf.

How a Dorsiventral Leaf is Adapted for Photosynthesis

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